2020 All-Mountain West

If there is a single, do-it-all ski – particularly for western, big-mountain skiing – it no doubt lives in this category and probably has a waist width of 98 or 100mm. The reason is simple: up to this girth (95mm-100mm), these relatively wide skis don’t feel fat underfoot, so they ride the groom like a Frontside ski yet provide as much flotation in powder as possible without the width being a negative when the powder is gone. Manufacturers recognize the importance of this genre and therefore give it their very best effort, creating a rich array of options for the high performance skier. It’s remarkable that one category can contain so many different sensations and almost every ski is really, really good.   Pay attention to this category, Dear Reader, for if you don’t already own an All-Mountain West ski, you will.

A mere 15 years ago we would have choked on these words, as skis 100mm underfoot then were niche models positioned as ideal for Alaskan heli-guides. The evolution that has taken place in the interim was triggered by the arrival of the Völkl Mantra in 2006, at first in the slightly more svelte waist width of 94mm. As with most Völkls made for men, then as now, there was no skimping on the quality of the construction: the Mantra was a rich, powerful ski right out of the chute. It performed like a soft GS race ski, but in a width that tracked through powder like the blitzkrieg, taking no prisoners. It quickly found a following due to Völkl’s already swollen ranks of faithful adherents, attracting the attention of every other major brand. (Nothing engenders a wave of imitators quite like creating a new niche with a high price tag.)

Driving the success of this genre is the eternal hope that part of the do-it-all equation will be a generous dose of fresh, deep powder. If you eliminate powder, and its evil twin, crud, from the mix of conditions in which you’ll use the ski, there’s no compelling reason to increase the ski’s flotation. But unless you live at the base of the ski resort, you can’t be sure what you’ll encounter on a big mountain; if a pocket of powder suddenly becomes available, wouldn’t you rather be on a ski that will embrace the situation? This is the mentality that has persuaded an increasingly large percentage of the market to gravitate to this genre.

Most, if not all, print-published ski tests would include under the All-Mountain West heading skis up to 110mm underfoot. Their inclusion is, in part, driven by the manufacturers, who want to increase the number of star products in this critical genre. But we believe bundling models on either side of the 100mm divide ignores a vital distinguishing trait: narrower skis put less strain on the skier in every condition but powder/crud. Sure, young bucks who log countless miles on western slopes use 108’s (and wider) as their everyday ski, God bless them. But we feel that the skis between 101 and 113mm underfoot should be treated as Big Mountain models that transparently sacrifice certain hard snow behaviors to achieve greater flotation – and presumed ease – in unbroken snow.

Within any genre there are skis that are curl-in-your-lap pussycats – our Finesse Favorites – and skis that are relentless fall-line predators, which we collect into our Power Favorites. The key virtue of the former is they improve ease and terrain access for less aggressive, lighter weight or lower skill skiers. The archetypical trait of the Power posse is they are utterly unflappable no matter where you go or how fast you go once you get there.

There isn’t a line of copy in any ski supplier’s brochure that would suggest their All-Mountain West ski possesses a single limitation, but this untempered enthusiasm conveniently overlooks a critical factor, namely the prospective skier’s skill level.

To be brief, anyone who would not classify himself or herself as advanced is looking behind the wrong door. To be less brief, if you don’t regularly tip the ski to a high edge angle, if you don’t ski with your feet extended away from your body, if you don’t have separation between the central angle of your upper body and the median that runs from your hips to your feet, if you don’t ski comfortably at speed, then you should look for a Frontside ski that will help you develop these skills.

The problem is that if a lower-skill skier acquires a model with a 100mm waist too early in his/her development, forward progress will freeze, slow down or even regress as the wider ski proves too cumbersome to tilt. The skier will probably feel better in powder and crud, but that’s about the extent of the benefits.

The 2020 All-Mountain West Field

All the unisex All-Mountain West models, whether new or returning, biased towards Power or Finesse properties, lightweight or burly, strive to serve two masters by providing enough surface area to facilitate off-piste skiing while retaining basic carving skills for when the off-trail is off-limits. AMW Finesse models focus on making off-road terrain easier to tame for less aggressive skiers, while Recommended Power skis come alive at higher revs. Once infused with speed, the top Power skis don’t so much float over choppy terrain as demolish it.

There aren’t many all-new AMW models this year, which is to be expected after an infusion of new designs last season. Atomic, Blizzard, Dynastar, Elan, Head, Nordica and Völkl left their 18/19 All-Mountain West stars alone, while Salomon and Stöckli improved on returning templates. Fischer, K2, Kästle, Liberty and Line debuted new AMW models, all of which deserve consideration but none of which are likely to significantly upset the status quo.

Power Picks: All-Condition Chargers

Not all the best skiers on big mountains use All-Mountain West skis as their everyday ski, but the ones that do are probably on one of our Power Picks. It’s not that less skilled skiers can’t handle them if sized appropriately, but these skis aren’t meant to mosey down the mountain. They’re built to batter down the stiffest crud, an approach that only works if the throttle is open. If you’re an expert skier and you haven’t tried one of these models yet, don’t let another season go by without doing so. To paraphrase the late, great Warren Miller, if you don’t do it this year, you’ll be another year older when you do.

To inject a personal note into the proceedings, I adhere to my own advice, choosing an All-Mountain West Power ski as my daily driver. If you’re a western skier who logs more than 30 days a season and charges the fall line, you probably already have one of these models. If you don’t, get one.

Blizzard Bonafide

I readily admit to an engrained bias in favor of the Blizzard Bonafide, as a pair has lived in the first row of my ski locker since its inception. I take them everywhere I go because I’m confident there’s no condition on earth they cannot ski, and ski well. The Bonafide has remained a perennial all-star for skiers because it’s built on sound fundamentals: a wood core made from poplar and beech sandwiched between laminates of multi-directional glass and Titanal. Its Flipcore design connects to the edge early, with no disruption in the snow connection from the modestly rockered forebody through the midsection to its flat, supportive tail. If one wished to pick a nit, it could be argued that the Bonafide is geared for the more skilled skier. But this is true of virtually all the more torsionally rigid models in the All-Mountain West genre. If you want to
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Kästle MX99

The Kästle MX99 should not be mistaken for a set of training wheels. If you’ve never owned a ski this wide before, this is probably not the best place to start. The MX99 expects you to be good. Very good, actually. If you’re an imposter, the MX99 can and will detect your fallibilities. This is your final warning. If you continue reading this review, you’ll end wanting a pair, and I’d feel better knowing you were qualified. The MX99 is unlike every other ski in the All-Mountain West genre. It’s the only ski in the category that evolved from a Frontside template, namely the exquisite MX84. It makes no attempt to dumb down its principles. Far from trying to disassociate the front of the ski from the rest of the chassis, as is the norm among AMW models, the MX99 tries to connect to the turn starting in the shovel.
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Völkl M5 Mantra

When the Völkl M5 Mantra appeared last season, it was received like an answered prayer by thousands of Mantra fans who didn’t much care for the iteration that preceded it. The attributes that had been erased over time – and that the M5 Mantra restored – were a tighter waist for more accurate hard-snow steering and conventional camber underfoot, for greater grip and control over trajectory. Völkl didn’t just resurrect an old Mantra concept; it created an entirely new recipe using the same classic components – wood, fiberglass and Titanal – that had helped put the original Mantra on the map. The new configuration is called Titanal Frame, for the difference maker is in how the top sheet of Titanal has been re-imagined. Instead of a solid, end –to-end laminate, Völkl broke the topsheet into three pieces: a .6mm thick section in the forebody that runs around the perimeter and
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Head Kore 99

Many lifelong skiers are familiar with the decidedly mixed history of lightweight skis. Anyone who wants to re-visit the dubious joys of a stripped-down ski can always hop on a $399 package ski. Suffice it to say, you’ll learn quickly to keep your speed in check. So I suspect most veteran testers who try a Head Kore model for the first time carry with them a hint of suspicion. You can tell in the hand that they’re lighter than the typical wood-and-metal make-up usually found at the top of this popular genre. Will a noticeably lighter ski like the Kore 99 measure up to the standard set by powerful skis like the Bonafide, MX99, M5 Mantra and Enforcer 100? Yes, indeed. The Kore 99 annihilates every negative ever associated with lightweight skis. Lightness doesn’t’ affect its grip or stability, which is nearly on a par with the metal-laden i.Rally. It
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Nordica Enforcer 100

What distinguishes the Nordica Enforcer 100 from the other benchmark models in the All-Mountain West category isn’t its poplar/beech/balsa core nor its two sheets of .4mm Titanal; it’s the length and flex of its traditional camber line that instill it with power, precision and pop off the edge. Most skis 100mm or more underfoot don’t have a lot of camber built into the baseline, so they’re easier to push around in soft snow. The Enforcer 100 isn’t drinking this Kool-Aid; it’s made for skiers who know how to stand on a ski and drive it. If you look at a pair base-to-base, you’ll notice that the while the tip and tail are amply rockered upward, they’re stubby in length, a shape Nordica aptly names Blunt Nose. The rest of the ski is arched considerably, assuring as long and secure an edge connection as you can find in a double-rockered baseline.
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Fischer Ranger 99 Ti

Fischer has been tinkering with its off-trail Ranger collection over the span of several seasons, searching for the fine line between lightweight, with its attendant ease of operation, and elite carving capability that can handle the transition to hard snow. For 20/20, the Ranger 99 Ti tilts the scales in favor of stability, amping up the carving power by reverting to square, ABS sidewalls straddling a classic, wood-and-Titanal sandwich. A carbon inlay in the tip lowers swingweight and overall mass, which is substantial enough (+150g vs. 18/19 Ranger 98 Ti) to keep it calm on corduroy, yet feels comparatively light when tearing through crud. A veteran tester from Joe’s Ski Shop [MN] summarizes his impressions of some of the Ranger 99 Ti’s more subtle changes: “The 19/20 model has a slight construction change from the 18/19 model – a change in the core materials and a bit less tip and
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Völkl 90EIGHT

How fleeting is stardom, how swiftly the limelight fades. It was only two years ago that the Völkl 90EIGHT was injected with new life by 3D.Glass, which this pundit declaimed as the most clever product upgrade of the year. Then along came the M5 Mantra and the 90EIGHT lost popularity like a close talker with bad breath. The problem with this fall from grace is that the two skis are quite different, despite having similar sidecuts and baselines, which would normally suggest some overlap in their behavioral profile. But their signature construction features are from two different worlds that have circled each other in the ski universe for decades: a metal laminate, traditionally the province of GS and speed event skis, versus a fiberglass torsion box, once upon a time the paradigm of race slalom design. When it comes to demolishing crud, the M5 is more of a bulldozer and
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Finesse Favorites: All-Terrain Access for All

The main reason to acquire an All-Mountain West ski is to get the widest ski possible you can use as an everyday ride. The reason you want the widest ski is so you can take it into powder and what’s left of powder between storms. To make that all-terrain access as effortless as possible, you want one of our Finesse Favorites.

The price of off-trail success can be some stability at high speed on hard snow, but this shouldn’t be a concern for advanced skiers who rarely reach the top of the end of the recreational speed range. When kept within their comfort zone – mid-radius turns at moderate speeds – our Finesse Favorites can motor through any terrain you care to traverse. For their ability to tame tough terrain with a tender touch, we award all our Finesse Favorites a Silver Skier Selection.

Line Vision 98

It’s fitting that Line’s new Vision 98 should top our rankings for All-Mountain West Finesse skis, as it’s commitment to skis that are surfy and playful is ironclad. The brand that began to make twin-tip skiboards 25 years ago this season is the only mainstream brand without even a toe-hold in the Technical or Frontside categories. If you’re looking for wide ski that mimics a carving ski’s accuracy, you’re in the wrong room. That said, the Vision 98 can hold its own in firm conditions because its moderately rockered tip and tail blend into the rest of its cambered baseline when it’s flexed, creating a long effective edge. Its flex distribution – geared towards a centered stance – shock dampening and liveliness are dictated by three high tech fibers, aramid, carbon and fiberglass, all working in concert to create an instantly responsive ski. Line calls this amalgam of materials THC™
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Liberty evolv100

Like any ski with metal in its make-up, the evolv100 isn’t light as a feather, but it’s so well balanced and responsive to steering input that even the most irregular snow requires less effort to navigate. Its ability to maintain its composure when under assault by adverse conditions allows the pilot to relax, a real energy saver on a pow day. By my thoroughly unscientific estimate, the average advanced skier can add up to three more runs per ski day just by switching to the evolv100. When Jim Schaffner likes a ski, you know it can hold up to a hard, sustained edge set delivered by a superb technician. After running it through a gamut of mid-winter snow varieties at Snow Basin (UT), Schaffner came away impressed. “This was a great all-rounder. It performed well in the mixed snow conditions.” For its even temperament and energy-saving equanimity in rough terrain,
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Elan Ripstick 96

The Elan Ripstick 96 is in the vanguard of the Lighter is Better movement. The core combines vertical laminates of two lightweight woods, poplar and Paulownia, sandwiched between sheets of fiberglass. To dampen the ride and add energy out of the turn, two 3mm-diameter carbon rods run the length of the ski near the edge, tracing the path of the sidecut in CNC machined grooves near the base of the core. Inlays made from a synthetic dampening agent, called Vapor Tip inserts, are integrated into the shovel to boost the lightweight chassis’ ability to absorb shock. Another major contributor to the Ripstick 96’s high scores for ease of operation is Elan’s unique asymmetric Amphibio design that abbreviates edge contact on the outside edge – i.e., adds rocker to it – while maximizing snow contact on the inside edge. For practitioners of continuous carving in which two edges are always riding
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Elan Ripstick 96 Black Edition

Enrobing a ski in a coating of carbon is like dosing it with Xanax; it calms the nerves and helps it focus on the task at hand. The inescapable comparative adjectives are “silkier” and “smoother.” With no metal underneath its ebony hide, Elan’s Ripstick 96 Black Edition needs something other than Titanal to give it the sangfroid required to batter crud aside. Its carbon sheath muffles the rough edges caused by crud-busting without hauling around the extra ounces Titanal entails. In lighter, softer, generally more congenial off-road conditions, the Ripstick 96 Black raises its game. It doesn’t matter if the depth of the latest layer is 3 centimeters or 3 feet, put any kind of cushion under it and it will practically purr with gratitude. Because it skis narrow, it’s also easier to find a high edge angle, which helps keep its rockered tip from getting twitchy and makes negotiating
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Salomon QST 99

Just last season Salomon improved the hard snow performance of the QST 99 by adding basalt to its foundational carbon/flax (C/FX) fibers. For 20/20, Salomon has re-configured its primary elements, mixing the basalt and carbon elements and using the flax in its own layer under the binding zone. The net effect is to augment the sense of support, not just underfoot, where there’s also a slice of Titanal, but all along the baseline. Two other changes to the ski design contribute mightily to the QST 99’s infusion of power and improved snow contact: 4mm’s of width have been pared away from both the tip and tail, so the new version doesn’t automatically try to steer out of the fall line, and the substitution of cork for Koroyd in the shovel. Salomon asserts that the “Cork Damplifier” is 16 times more proficient at absorbing shock and even lighter weight. With its
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Atomic Bent Chetler 100

To give you an idea of what a steal the Bent Chetler 100 was last year, Atomic understandably raised its likely retail price by $100 and it’s still the best value in the category. But the Bent Chetler 100 is more than just a good deal; it’s a wonderfully versatile ski that is as easy to ski in off-trail conditions as any AMW model at any price. The key to the Bent Chetler 100’s charms is it Horizon Tech tip and tail which are rockered on both axes. By crowning its extremities, the littler Chetler feels like it can drift in any direction on a whim without losing control of trajectory. When in its element, it’s the epitome of ease, rolling over terrain like a spatula over icing. The Bent Chetler 100 is all about freedom of expression rather than the tyranny of technical turns. So what if it’s liberty-loving
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Dynastar Menace 98

With a name like Menace, this Dynastar sounds like a handful, but it actually takes instruction well. (As long as we’re not talking about hard snow carving, which lies outside its definition of “fun.”) It’s simplicity itself to pivot, which is essential if you’re going to ride it like a beast with two heads. Even if your intent is to always face downhill, this putty-knife smear-ability comes in handy in lumpy off-trail conditions where a narrower twin-tip won’t move sideways with equal facility. And when the snow is light and fluffy and you can set your own line, the Menace 98 bounces off the base of a bottomless turn and uses that energy to surface and slash to the other side of the fall line. Whether you prefer your powder turns to be forward, backward or sideways, the Menace 98 is ready to accommodate.

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Line Supernatural 100

Line turns 25 this year, still young by old guard Euro brand standards, and still able to speak directly, eye-to-eye and bong-hit-by-bong-hit, with today’s alienated youth. Rebels define themselves by what they are not, and in the case of the slacker rebels Line rabble-rouses, the list of things they’re not into is long: Super-carving on groomers. (Super-carving in pow is allowed and is totally awesome.) Color-matched outfits, unless it’s ironic. Ski lessons that involve drills. Any other ski lessons. (Narrow skis.) Ski fashion. Stories that begin, “You should have been here…” Any racing that involves missing actual skiing. Any waiting for anyone on a pow day. The Man. You get the idea. Based on this partial list, you’d think every Line would be twin-tipped, center-mounted and only operable by someone who started shaving in the last five years. But Line is in fact sneaky technical. Most of its models are
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Dynastar Legend X 96

The co-author of Snowbird Secrets, “Guru” Dave Powers, skis on a Dynastar Legend X 96. Its entire forebody serves as a shock-sucking buffer, due to a 3-piece segment of sidewall that frees up the laminates in the core to sheer. This allows the ski to conform to terrain it would otherwise ram into, and is a particular pleasure in powder as it lets the ski bow without having to charge the fall line. The absence of end-to-end Titanal laminates also plays to Powers requirements. (The Legend X 96 has a Ti insert underfoot to stabilize this critical zone.) No metal slabs means less weight onboard, means less stress on his ravaged knees. Absent the torsional rigidity of full Ti laminates, the 96mm Legend X skis narrower than it measures, which is a significant blessing for skiers with little to no cartilage left. For providing a smooth, easy-flexing ride that won’t
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2020 Women’s All-Mountain West

In yet another example of our cutting-edge journalism, permit us to point out that men and women are different. The pertinent manifestation of this principle is that the same width ski that makes an ideal men’s all-terrain tool is a tad too wide to be an everyday ride for all but the most talented lasses. Put more succinctly, if you don’t instinctively ride an elevated edge angle, a ski from the All-Mountain West genre should be a second, soft-snow pair of skis.

The primary reason for taking this precaution is that a wider ski takes more effort to roll up on edge. A lower skill skier is more likely to just push it around, all fun and games in soft snow but a bit like an unguided missile when the snow firms up. Lower skill skiers tend to regard our Power Picks as lacking in forgiving traits, while the experts who log many miles a season don’t detect any unfriendly attitudes no matter where or how they ski them.

So what woman does belong on an All-Mountain West model? As long as it’s a second ski reserved for soft snow conditions, there’s really no upper or lower suitability threshold for any of our favorites. And yes, it can be an everyday ski for a strong, athletic woman and probably is serving that function for those lucky enough to ski over 50 days a year. They do make it look effortless, but it’s worth noting these are ladies who drop their hips within inches of the snow as a matter of course.

The 2020 Women’s All-Mountain West Field

Most women don’t want a ski this wide as their everyday ski, limiting their market appeal to second-pair buyers. Less demand leads inevitably to lower model turnover, so there’s only one fresh face in this small field, Kästle’s FX96 W. The rest of our test panel’s Recommended models consist of three well-established queens of the genre, plus one super value for women with abundant talent but limited resources.

Our list of Recommended models would be longer – and probably different in other respects, as well – if only we could capture more feedback on women’s AMW models. Because of the paucity of data, the numeric scores that determine Power and Finesse ratings aren’t as reliable indicators of behavior as they are in other, more popular categories. A ski listed among our Power Picks could easily flip to the Finesse side, and visa versa.

The holes in our data allowed several potential Recommended models to ride below our panel’s radar, including the new Fischer My Ranger 96 Ti, Salomon’s QST Lumen 99 and the Völkl 90EIGHT W.

Power Picks: All-Condition Chargers

Over the last several seasons, the brawniest skis in the Women’s All-Mountain West genre have been mellowing out. Gone are the models that simply replicate a carving construction in a fatter profile; today’s WAMW models are unequivocally off-piste appliances. The ones with the best on-trail traits are our Power Picks; any ladies looking in this genre for an everyday ski should look here (and add the Santa Ana 100 to the must-see list).

Dynastar Legend W 96

One of my ardently held beliefs about ski design, for which I have no statistical support, is that every model family has a star, a width at which all its other design parameters are optimized. For example, in Salomon’s QST collection, it’s the 106; in Kästle’s MX family, it’s the 84, and in Dynastar’s 4-model Legend W series, it’s the 96. What makes the W 96 the belle of the ball? The Legend W series is directly descended from Dynastar’s Cham clan, an early adopter of the 5-point sidecut. The 5-point sidecut keeps the tip and tail from engaging with the cambered zone underfoot, effectively keeping them out of the turning business and helping the skis to roll over terrain rather than digging into it. This shape was made expressly for Big Mountain skiing; it’s at its best when it’s wide, and a waist around 96mm is about as broad
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Blizzard Black Pearl 98

Blizzard’s Flipcore baseline, the heart and soul of the Black Pearl 98, has probably been the most commercially successful execution of a double-rockered baseline since rocker first reared its ugly head (and tail) over a decade ago. Flipcore certainly has left a mark on the women’s market, where the Black Pearl franchise is a well-oiled sales machine. The Black Pearl 98 isn’t the sales phenom that it’s little sister is, but then nothing can match the records being set by the Black Pearl 88. The reason for the sales imbalance is simple: the BP 88 is an everyday ski, the proverbial one-ski quiver if ever there was one. While the BP 98 could be the regular ride if the pilot is a strong skier, both physically and technically, but more often than not it’s going to a second pair reserved for powder and powder-ish days. Whether or not the Black
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Atomic Vantage 97 C W

[Neither the Vantage 97 C W nor its scores have changed since this review was posted last season.] For its 2019 Vantage collection of all-mountain skis, Atomic took a different approach to executing the ideals of the Lighter Is Better movement in product design. Instead of looking for ways to remove material from existing archetypes, Atomic began with the most elemental design imaginable and added only what’s required to turn a shape into a ski. As you’d expect from a ski built to be as minimalist as possible, in the hand the Vantage 97 C W feels light enough to fly away, but it’s so stable on snow one tester even found it “stiff-ish.” It’s certainly a lot more ski than is normally available at a street price of $499. Kelli Gleason of Boot Doctors in Telluride, pegs the 2019 Vantage 97 C W as “more powerful than its predecessor,
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Finesse Favorites: Killing it Softly

Women who don’t attack every run like it was The Charge of the Light Brigade want a ski that will navigate through off-trail conditions at a trot instead of a gallop. For these more leisurely lasses, we recommend the easy-going charms of our Finesse Favorites. Lighter weight women who have a tough time tilting a Big Mountain model should consider one of these narrower All-Mountain West models as a second pair specifically for powder.

Kästle FX96 W

For the 19/20 season, Kästle completely re-formulated its FX series of wide, off-trail models. To create its first-ever women’s model in the FX family, Kästle choose to work off the FX96 template, as the 96mm waist width optimizes the strengths of the new design for female skiers. One of the goals of the new FX series was weight reduction, so Kästle engineers concocted Tri-Tech, a trifecta of design features all aimed at keeping weight off. Tri-Tech is essentially a core-within-a-core; a central channel of high-density woods is wrapped in a glass torsion box and braced on either side with lighter wood laminates. The torsion box rides higher than the outer sections, creating a 3D top surface, which is the first weight-saver. Second is the concentration of hard woods in the center, so lighter woods can be used in the remaining 2/3 of the core. Third is using a thicker core
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Nordica Santa Ana 100

The Nordica Santa Ana 100 is easily the most torsionally rigid of our four Recommended women’s All-Mountain West models, usually an indicator of a higher Power quotient, yet it’s so easy to ski – for advanced to expert women – that its scores landed it on the Finesse side of the ledger. But as I occasionally stress in these pages, while the numbers are instructive, they don’t reveal as much about a ski’s character as the narrative. Listen closely to what a couple of our testers had to say about the Santa Ana 100 and you’ll hear suggestions that both these ladies thought the ski is, if anything, too powerful. “Great all around ski,” is the general assessment of Jolee from Footloose, with this proviso: ”A little too much ski for hard pack, but for a woman who charges it’s terrific. Handles great off groomed snow,” she adds. Becca Pierce
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